I’m struggling to get my child into sport

Kids not playing blog

As a business that offers children’s football coaching in Leeds we speak to a lot of parents who understand the benefits of their children playing sport but their son/daughter simply isn’t interested.
Getting kids active through sport goes a long way to keeping our little ones healthy in both body and mind, but what can you do if your child says they don’t want to do it?
Don’t force it
First thing to understand is that if you force them into something, even if you’re doing it for the right reasons, it may result in them developing a negative feeling towards playing sport.
Age can also play a part in this. We’ve found the very young ones (4-6 years old) can take a 2-3 weeks to really get comfortable. Put yourself in their tiny shoes – it can look pretty scary for them turning up to football training with loads of other children confidently running around doing the activity.
Usually we find that confidence is the main issue. They often don’t feel good enough (for a variety of reasons) and therefore will do all they can to stay away from playing football, tennis, rugby etc.
One thing we recommend to parents in the above instances is to simply come to the session and let their child go at their own pace. Even if it means standing near the other children and just kicking a football to their child whilst the session is going on around them, it goes a long way to getting them comfortable with the environment. Once they have had some time watching other children like them doing it they can all of a sudden get a surge of confidence.
On the flip side, you may force them to go to a children’s football training session (for example) and they end up loving it. The risk of them hating it is there, though, so tread carefully.
Speak to the coach/sports provider
Before you sign your child up to a sports team or sports provider be sure to ask the coach what they have in place for absolute beginners or children who aren’t confident.
You can really help your child by taking them somewhere that caters to their needs. If you take them somewhere hyper competitive or geared towards children with high sporting ability levels then you run the risk of destroying their confidence even more.
Don’t start competitive
This leads on to competitive sports.
If your child is already showing a lack of interest then one of the worst things to do would be to take them somewhere hyper-competitive. This will not help them.
If they aren’t showing a particular interest right away then that is likely to decrease if they are thrown into an environment where every other child is competing for a starting place on the team.
This was one of the reasons we started Foot-Tech Academy. We are able to provide football coaching in a non-pressurised environment that bridges the gap between playing football and getting into a team.
We focus on kids football training in Leeds but you’ll find a host of other coaching businesses in your location that cater for other sports.
This can be a great way of getting your child into sport in a way that helps them as an individual instead of a team which needs to, a lot of time, focus on what is best for the group as a whole.
Just let it be…for now
Final thing is to not panic.
We know that sport is a great thing for children and can understand why so many parents want their child to get into a sporting activity.
Our advice is to not rush it. We have seen countless times that children can one day go from being completely uninterested in anything other than watching other children play with toys on YouTube (don’t get us started on that!) to then wanting to play and talk about nothing else other than football.
It can literally happen over-night and is often due to their friends at school getting into it.
If your child simply does not want to do anything sport-related then it is a case of making sure you keep them active in other ways whether it be trips to the park or things like trampolines etc. There are loads of different ways to keep active whereby your child has fun and stays healthy.
Foot-Tech Academy provides innovative children’s football coaching in Leeds for boys and girls aged 4-14.
We also provide specialist speed training, after-school clubs and holiday camps.
For more info check out http://www.foot-techacademy.co.uk
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The Multi-Sport Benefit for Young Footballers

2016 was a great one for sport. The blend of football (Euro 2016) and the Olympics over in Rio has got us thinking about the proven benefits of youth footballers playing other sports.

To master a skill it is said that 10,000 hours of purposeful practice must be undertaken (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26384712). Practice is something we at Foot-Tech continuously encourage but does it only ever need to involve a football?

Looking at the elite players it is clear that they are experts with a football but they are also athletically advanced in terms of running speed, balance, coordination, agility, overall fitness and flexibility.

Just playing football will of course help in all of the above areas but a lot of evidence is suggesting that playing other sports can significantly advance a young players’ ability on the pitch.

Let’s consider some of the examples of players who were involved in other sports growing up:

Wayne Rooney says his boxing really helped his football development

Gareth Bale played rugby alongside Sam Warburton (Wales Rugby Union Captain)

Zlatan Ibrahimovic is a black belt in Taekwondo

Joe Hart played Cricket for Worcestershire and could have gone pro

James Miler represented his school in long-distance running

Theo Walcott set a 100m record at his high school

The list goes on and, unfortunately, we see this as something that is not viewed as important in a child’s overall development. Some academies in the UK even forbid their young players from participating in other sports and, understandably, parents go ahead with it believing it to be the right thing.

Some will argue for and some will argue against. We are dedicated football coaches and love the game but we believe a combination of sports can help a young footballer. Clearly football would need to be the primary sport (or does it?) but adding other sports can be so beneficial.

Combat sports and martial arts are great for stamina and coordination, gymnastics is superb for core strength and flexibility, rugby helps with the development of team understanding and interval running…….we could list almost any sport and explain how they could help a young players’ football development.

So, if you don’t already, consider encouraging your child/children to participate in other sports. They’ll move their bodies in new ways, learn new things and, most importantly, have another hobby in their lives to enjoy.

Who knows – if they don’t get the chance to play in a Euro’s in the future they may just get the chance to go win a Gold Medal elsewhere!

If you would like any advice on the sports we recommend please speak to any of the Foot-Tech coaches or send us an email to foot-techacademy@outlook.com

www.foot-techacademy.co.uk